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Warning to Hunters & Outdoor Enthusiasts

August 24, 2006

Marijuana plant

Marijuana growing creates problems
around Happy Camp on both public and private lands.

Yreka – The Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Department would like to remind the public to be especially wary and vigilant during this time of year. The marijuana harvest season is fast approaching and conflicts between the public and those conducting illegal growing operations on both public and private lands are possible.

Sheriff Rick Riggins urges the public to exercise caution and to be aware of their surroundings. He cautions the public to avoid areas where they may see suspicious activity occurring. Anyone who encounters gardening supplies, irrigation systems and isolated camps in the woods should immediately leave the area and contact law enforcement.

Individuals are asked to contact the Sheriff’s Department 24-hour dispatch center at (530) 841-2900. Those who wish to speak with the Marijuana Team directly or who prefer to remain anonymous may leave a message at (530) 842-8328. The Sheriff”s Department Marijuana Eradication Team will aggressively investigate all reports of suspicious activity.

Sheriffs Department Website




Happy Camp Complex Forest Fire Update

Fire Retardant Drop

Fire retardant drop in the Happy Camp Complex fires. Photo by Ken Black of the Deadwood Strike

August 24, 2006, 11:00 am

From the Northern California Joint Incident Information Center

Current Situation: A weak low pressure trough over northern California will move east today and high pressure will build in behind it. Low humidity with gusty winds is expected. The air mass in northern California remains stable and dry with temperatures in the upper 80s and mid 90s.

Visitors need to be aware that there are numerous road, trail and area closures in place. Before heading out, please contact the local Forest Service Unit or log onto Inciweb.Org for additional information about fire-related restrictions and closures.

Air quality monitoring stations are in place. For additional information, please visit the following website: http://gacc.nifc.gov/oncc/predictive/weather/airquality.html.

No active Fire Weather Watches or Warnings are in effect today in Northern California.

The Joint Incident Information Center will no longer be staffed. However, the daily summary will continue to be updated and e-mailed to the current mailing list. Please visit Inciweb.Org for information related to all incidents and to obtain local contact information.

Northern California Region Active Totals

  • Major Incidents / Complexes: 4
  • Acres Burned: 54,448
  • Cost of active fires: $49,763,305
  • Personnel Committed: 1,328
  • Firefighter Injuries: 22
  • Fatalities (Aerial Firefighting Personnel): 2

Resources Committed

  • Engines: 16
  • Firefighting Crews: 29
  • Dozers: 3
  • Helicopters: 17
  • Overhead Personnel: 532

Between July 23rd and August 24th a total of 8 large fire incidents have occurred in the Northern California Region. Those large fires have burned more than 74,122 acres costing over $72,738,673 in suppression efforts.

INCIDENT SUMMARIES

Orleans Complex: Six Rivers National Forest; 15,710 acres; 70% Contained; Estimated Containment Date: 9/30/06; Total Personnel: 366; Cost to Date: $15M; Type 2 Incident Management Team (Sinclear) is assigned. Limited interior burning continues, primarily in the upper portions of Pearch Creek drainage. Firefighters continue to hold containment line on Highway 96 and Salmon River Road. Cultural resources remain threatened. A public meeting will be held tonight at 7p.m. at the Karuk Community Center in Orleans to introduce the incoming Incident Management Team. For more information on this fire, please visit http://inciweb.org/incident/370.

Bar Complex: Shasta-Trinity National Forest; 20,289 acres; 46% contained; Estimated Containment Date: 9/15/06; Total Personnel: 523; Cost to Date: $15M; A Type 1 Incident Management Team (Dietrich) is assigned. Fire continues to move easterly toward Limestone Ridge and south from Pony Butte/Salmon Mountain Ridge. Residence and historic mining sites continue to be threatened. Heavy smoke remains over the communities in and around Weaverville and as far away east as Redding. For more information, please visit http://inciweb.org/incident/357/

Uncles Complex: Klamath National Forest; 14,631 acres; 35% contained; Estimated Containment Date: 10/3/06; Total Personnel: 106; Cost to Date: $9M; A Fire Use Management Team (Hahnenberg) has been assigned and will continue to manage the incident under suppression strategy while planning long term fire assessment. Fire fighters are working diligently ahead of the fires to protect historic and recreational structures. For more information on this fire, please visit http://inciweb.org/incident/348/ .

Happy Camp Complex: Klamath National Forest; 3,818 acres; 85% contained; Estimated Containment Date: 9/1/06; Total Personnel: 333; Cost to Date: $9M; A Type 2 Incident Management Team (Garwood) is assigned. No increased fire activity. This will be the last incident summary for Happy Camp Complex unless there is substantial change. For more information on this fire, please visit http://inciweb.org/incident/361/.

Additional Northern California Fire Information can be found at the following weblinks:
California Fire Information
California Department of Forestry & Fire Protection




Mule Teams Assist Firefighters

August 14, 2006

By Chris Auringer

Auringer is a Public Information Officer working on the Uncles Complex fires.

Aircraft availability is always an issue when things get really busy during fire season, and not everything firefighters do requires a high-tech approach. Sometimes low-tech/old-tech is the ticket.

Mule strings can provide a valuable, less expensive, and often safer alternative to helicopter operations when moving cargo on fire incidents. Mules can also operate when visibility is poor due to smoke or weather, which can preclude the use of aircraft. It makes sense to use mule teams if they are close by and available.

On Tuesday August 8, firefighters on the Rush fire, located in the Trinity Alps Wilderness on the Klamath National Forest, requested a mule team to assist Hot Shot crews working in the steep, remote terrain northeast of the Petersburg work station. The mule team, comprised of about 8 mules and 3 horses, is led by veteran packer Ellen Andrews. Ellen works for the U.S. Forest Service out of the Salmon River Work Station located south of Sawyer’s Bar.

Ellen and assistant Dick Eastlick led the mule string out to pack in water and supplies, as well as haul out trash, for crews on the east side of the fire above Rush and McNeil Creeks. The Rush Fire is one of three large, lightning-caused fires on the Uncles Complex; the others being the Uncles and Hancock Fires, located in the Marble Mountain Wilderness.

Andrews’ mule team is also being considered for use on the Hancock fire because of the steepness of the terrain. Ellen Andrews is a packer who has considerable experience in the Klamath region, “I’ve spent a lot of time up in the Hancock area.” she said, “It’s some of the toughest country out here but it’s also one of my favorite places”.

The Hancock fire is in terrain so steep, that, to date, air operations have been the method of choice for monitoring and combating the fire. As firefighters gain control of the Rush and Uncles Fires more resources may be diverted to the Hancock.

Given the proximity of Ellen’s team to the Uncles complex, and the fact that alfalfa is cheaper than aviation fuel, it looks like the mules may have a job… now what’s their “E” (Equipment) number?




Dr. Mathew Johnson To Speak About His Bigfoot Sighting At The Happy Camp Bigfoot Jamboree

August 1, 2006

Dr. Matthew Johnson

What would make a well-known expert on child rearing and families admit to having seen a hairy primate on a family outing at the Oregon Caves? It is one of those experiences that people look askance at you if it’s mentioned, or ask what you’d been imbibing in at the time. But if scientific training and intellectual honesty compel him to admit his experience, what does he have to say? Dr. Mathew Johnson will be presenting his PowerPoint presentation at the pavilion of the happy Camp River Park on Saturday afternoon at 5:30 p.m. You won’t want to miss it!









Klamath River Resort Inn
Klamath River Resort Inn






Indian Creek

Indian Creek, downstream from the Eddy.


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Happy Camp River Access Buck

A buck at the Happy Camp River Access.


Elk Creek Bridge

The Elk Creek Bridge.


Klamath River

Downriver, about four miles.