Sunrise Celebration At Airport

by Judy Bushy

Easter comes early this year, March 23rd. We no sooner finish the wearing of the green for St. Patrick’s Day and it is time for Christians all over the world to Celebrate the Resurrection of Jesus Christ from the grave!

It has been a tradition in Happy Camp for the Happy Camp Bible Church, the Assembly of God and the Christian Fellowship to get together to celebrate on this one day of the year. That celebration takes place at Sunrise (7:30 AM) at the Happy Camp Airport up Airport Road. The churches share responsibilty for the music, message and prayer and a large number gather despite the chill in the air and the early hour.

Following the Sunrise Service, all are invited to take part in a potluck breakfast at the Happy Camp Elementary School where Praise music will continue in the joyous tradition.

You are invited and would be most welcome!!

Elk Fire Complex Update From The Forest Service

Total Complex Acreage: 9,197 acres
Incident Resources: 1,107 personnel
Total Complex Containment: 28%
Expected Full Containment: 7/29/2007
Cost to Date: $8,897,560
Injuries to Date (minor): 8
Structures Threatened: 550
Fatalities to Date: 1

Yesterday, a pilot under contract was killed when his helicopter crashed near the Elk Fire while providing logistical support to firefighters. Weexpress our deepest condolences, and our thoughts are with h is families. A Forest Service National Accident Investigation Team is arriving today to begin their investigation into the helicopter accident.

The protection of the Happy Camp and Elk Creek communities remains a top priority. Yesterday, crews made excellent progress constructing firelines(see list below). Burnout operations, which reinforce significant portions of the containment line, have been completed on the Little Grider Fire, near Happy Camp, CA. A burnout was initiated last night on the northeast perimeter Wingate Fire and is expected to continue late into Tuesday.

Complex Fire Details

Of the thirty identified fires in the Elk Complex, 24 are 100% contained.

The fires will continue to be monitored, patrolled and staffed as safety, resources and access permit. The remaining six fires are as follows:

· Little Grider Fire (1,952 acres) 60% contained. Burnout operations are complete.

· King Creek II Fire (2975 acres) 25 % contained. Line construction continued on the fire.

· Wingate (916 acres) 5% contained. Burnout operations have begun.

· Elk Fire (1144 acres) 40% contained. Crews established direct line on the fire’s northern and eastern perimeters.

· Titus Fire (2043 acres) 5% contained. A recommended evacuation for homeowners, and closure for campers and miners, from Five Mile Bridge to Norcross Campground on Elk Creek Road remains in place. Firelines have been constructed around structures.

· Hummingbird Fire (80 acres) 0% contained.

Evacuation Planning:

The Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Department has taken steps to locate an evacuation center at Seiad Elementary School in the event evacuation becomes necessary. Individuals with special needs, such as those requiring mobility assistance, need to notify the Sheriff’s Department ahead of time.

Sources of info include: http://www.inciweb.org (including other fires) or
the incident information office at (530) 841-4451. Visit
http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/klamath for information on fire restrictions and
local closures.

Teacher’s Learning about Karuk Culture

One very special item that Jennifer Goodwin and Erin Hillman shared with teachers this week was the creation of regalia for a girl to dance in ceremonies this weekend. It took many hours of work over weeks to sew and decorate the skin skirts with fringes, shells, beads albalone, deertoes, and braided bear grass but it was beautiful and made a pleasant sound as it moved around. The design on the top was “friendship design.” The skirts were made by grant of $5,000 and worn by Frankie Snyder in her first ceremonial dance. 

 The Karuk Tribe of California Education Program Director, Jennifer Goodwin, arranged an exciting opportunity for teachers in the area schools learn more about the cultural background of the students in their classes. Not only were teachers from Happy Camp Elementary and High Schools but Jefferson Continutation school and Junction School from Somes Bar. It was a pleasure to have Tom Fox of the Northern California Writing Project and transferring soon to the the National Writing Project share current resources for teaching writing.

 A panel was assembled to answer all the questions that the teachers cared to ask about the Karuk culture, past and present. Jennifer and Erin shared the regalia project. Dan Goodwin, tonyu, Blanche, Bud Johnson,  of fisheries, Paula McCarthy, Clayton Tuttle, Ben Harrison and Phinuggtuuf took part in the panel. The brush dance was traditionally done at the home of a sick child for healing and although it is still done for healing, it is done on a regular basis for good health and prosperity to preserve the tradition. There isn’t alot of “pow wow” dancing here but war dancing was mentioned. Community is always open to watch and usually food for all. It’s a way of balancing, a way of living, they said. Because the Karuk never had a reservation each family had their own place that they lived from Bluff Creek to Seiad Valley. When the gold rush intruded into this place, the government wanted to ship them all out to Hoopa, not realizing there was differences between Hoopa Tribe, Yurok Tribe and Karuk Tribe who didn’t speak the same language at all.  The Yurok were “downriver “people and the Karuk “upriver people.” Paula McCarthy siad her mom was sent to Indian School in Riverside and Native Americans there were punished for speaking their native languages. The Karuk Tribe of California started with 10 or 12 acres donated to the Tribe in Orleans and has purchased and developed nearly 600 acress in Orleans, Witchepec, Happy Camp and Yreka since being recognized.  Verna shared how she learned basketweaving from Grace and Madeline Davis and they wanted her to “pass it on.” Kenneth Brink said, “Red devils, blue devils or dust devils”, the Putawan is a devil, but “not so scarry anymore.” The mascot of the Happy Camp Elementary School has been the Putawan for many years. So the teachers learned many new things from the panel on the Karuk culture and hopes are to share further in the future. 

 Besides delving into discussions on “What connections there are or could be between writing in school and writing in real life in Happy Camp,” there were opportunities to talk to tribal members about their culture and Tribal employees about how they use writing in their employment, working with language as Susan Gehr, writing grants like   or writing lessons to teach. reports, minutes, agenda’s and articles.  

Chamber Board Elected 2003

2003 Chamber Board

2003 Chamber Board


Newly elected board members of the Happy Camp Chamber of Commerce met to plan for launching of projects for the new year at Pizza House in Happy Camp.

Shown are Tom Jobe of Klamath Inn and RV park who will serve as treasurer, Tom Waddell from Karuk Community Development Corporation, Joe Giera of Klamath Country Rafting Co. who will serve as secretary with the help of Becca, President Cheryl Wainwright of Health and harmony and Craig Williamson of Alchemists Den who will be vice president. Also elected, but not present at this meeting are Rosemary Boren and Robert Schmalzbach.

They will begin their term of office with a meeting for all membership on January 13th which is postponed from the previous week. All members and the public are invited to the Family Resource Center meeting at 6:30 Tuesday January 13th.

Disc Golf Coming Soon

A phenomena sweeping the nation with flying objects identified as discs, will soon be a part of the Happy Camp recreation scene. Local resident, Louis Tiraterra, put together a committee to oversee the creation of our own nine-hole quality disc golf course, which will eventually be expanded to a full 18-hole course.The object of the game is to throw a disc from a tee pad into a basket on a pole. Though well-bred players use professional, weighted discs, anyone could choose to use a simple frisbee.

The game of disc throwing has been around in various forms and cultures from the beginning of history, but modern disc golf evolved from the frisbee craze of the sixties. The first disc golf course, opened in 1975 in Pasadena, California, started a nationwide expansion of the sport.

Ground breaking for the new course is expected to start on July 13, 2002. A dedication ceremony is planned for August 31, 2002, during the Bigfoot Jamboree. Besides Louis A. Tiraterra, President and Founder of the Association, additional committee members are Erik Haskel, Doug Goodwin, Don Voyles, Dennis Day, Charles Mayton, Mike Tiraterra, and Lou Tiraterra Senior. Donations to cover the cost of the project are now being accepted.

An Abbreviated History of Disc Golf

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