Little Log Chapel in the Hills 1928

by Leon L. Loofbourow
We have all read of the original John Wesley runing three times around the Charter House school quadrangle each morning to build up his weak body. But haven you heard of one John Wesley who won the 462 mile marathon race from San Francisco’s City Hall to Grants Pass Oregon?
In 1927 the Redwood Empire Association, as its advertising featujre, planned an Indian Marathon Race over the Redwood Highway. Of eleven entrants, two boys from our work on the Klamath River won first and second places! John Wesley Southare received first award for completing the race in less than a week–as I remember it, in six days, twentythree hours and sixteen minutes.
This particular John Wesley story begins a century ago when the California gold rush, kuje tge Jubgdin if Geavebm gathered all kinds. He sought his fortun e far down the Klamath River. I have never heard how much “dust” he acquired. But he married an Indian woman and when the placers played out, unline many of the miners, he stayed by his family on the Klamath. Their oldest son was named Lee in loyalty to the great Christian captain of the Confederacy, Robert E. Lee.
I was guest one night in the Lee Southard home. (We were to try our luck for bear next day.) At family prayers my host brought out his Bible and old Moody and Sankey song books. I thought I would try out the family knowledge of the Scriptures, so suggested that we repeat together instead of reading. All went well with the group through Psalm 23. Some of the circle were uncertain on Psalm 1. But Mr. Southard and I kept going until I thougth it wise to call our Bible marathon a tie, and we prayed. But it made me realize that ‘Forty -Niner John Wesley did not leave his faith in Louisiana–he had “taught it diligently” to his son.
The Lee Southards named their first born, John Wesley, for his grandfather. In the Redwood Empire Marathon the newspapers thought they must have “heap big Injun” names for the runners, so a waiting world was informed that MAD BULL won the race. But Mad Bull was only the way the papers featured John Wesley Southard, son of School District Trustee–Church School Superintendent Lee Southard, grandson of ‘Forty-Niner John Wesley Southard.
Months later I heard that a younger brother of John’s had died and wrote to the family. I quote from Lee Southard’s answer:
“We have one consolation, that those who die without the law shall be judged without the law, and Gorham was a good boy and never harmed anyhone. But he never had chance of a religious training further than his mother and I had taught him. Should you ever get back up this way I wish you to preach his funeral.
The next summer the log church in Happy Camp was built, its nearest meetinghouse neighbor being 75 miles away. The first service in it was the memorial for this boy who “never had the chance of a religious training further than what his mother and I taught him.”

Good School Year Comes to an End

u0hsgraduation-3
Judy Bushy
June 10, 2008
By the time you read this school will be out. Finals are keeping most of the high school students busy this week except for the senior class. Seniors are busy decorating and attending to last minute details for the conclusion of their high school education.

It has been a very good school year. Mr. Dyar surprised all the students who thought they’d surprise a new principal who didn’t know them!!! He knows the students, having seen them in their earlier years at the Elementary School. Mr. Dyar also has the respect of the students and they have responded well and had a good year for the most part.

We also had a new District Superintendent. Doug Squellati. While the students don’t see a lot of the District Superintendent (although I heard some Seniors that he interviewed who were very appreciative that he was nice and friendly and wasn’t scary!). The staff appreciated Mr. Squellati’s hard work this year. For the first time in many years Happy Camp teachers and staff feel that someone at the District takes an interest in our school and our students. Although distant geographically, local residents, who are taxpayers, feel equal funding, modernization of facilities and expenditures of all students are important. Mr. Squellati brought fairness and financial expertise that is much needed and appreciated

Sunrise Celebration At Airport

by Judy Bushy

Easter comes early this year, March 23rd. We no sooner finish the wearing of the green for St. Patrick’s Day and it is time for Christians all over the world to Celebrate the Resurrection of Jesus Christ from the grave!

It has been a tradition in Happy Camp for the Happy Camp Bible Church, the Assembly of God and the Christian Fellowship to get together to celebrate on this one day of the year. That celebration takes place at Sunrise (7:30 AM) at the Happy Camp Airport up Airport Road. The churches share responsibilty for the music, message and prayer and a large number gather despite the chill in the air and the early hour.

Following the Sunrise Service, all are invited to take part in a potluck breakfast at the Happy Camp Elementary School where Praise music will continue in the joyous tradition.

You are invited and would be most welcome!!

Elk Fire Complex Update From The Forest Service

Total Complex Acreage: 9,197 acres
Incident Resources: 1,107 personnel
Total Complex Containment: 28%
Expected Full Containment: 7/29/2007
Cost to Date: $8,897,560
Injuries to Date (minor): 8
Structures Threatened: 550
Fatalities to Date: 1

Yesterday, a pilot under contract was killed when his helicopter crashed near the Elk Fire while providing logistical support to firefighters. Weexpress our deepest condolences, and our thoughts are with h is families. A Forest Service National Accident Investigation Team is arriving today to begin their investigation into the helicopter accident.

The protection of the Happy Camp and Elk Creek communities remains a top priority. Yesterday, crews made excellent progress constructing firelines(see list below). Burnout operations, which reinforce significant portions of the containment line, have been completed on the Little Grider Fire, near Happy Camp, CA. A burnout was initiated last night on the northeast perimeter Wingate Fire and is expected to continue late into Tuesday.

Complex Fire Details

Of the thirty identified fires in the Elk Complex, 24 are 100% contained.

The fires will continue to be monitored, patrolled and staffed as safety, resources and access permit. The remaining six fires are as follows:

· Little Grider Fire (1,952 acres) 60% contained. Burnout operations are complete.

· King Creek II Fire (2975 acres) 25 % contained. Line construction continued on the fire.

· Wingate (916 acres) 5% contained. Burnout operations have begun.

· Elk Fire (1144 acres) 40% contained. Crews established direct line on the fire’s northern and eastern perimeters.

· Titus Fire (2043 acres) 5% contained. A recommended evacuation for homeowners, and closure for campers and miners, from Five Mile Bridge to Norcross Campground on Elk Creek Road remains in place. Firelines have been constructed around structures.

· Hummingbird Fire (80 acres) 0% contained.

Evacuation Planning:

The Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Department has taken steps to locate an evacuation center at Seiad Elementary School in the event evacuation becomes necessary. Individuals with special needs, such as those requiring mobility assistance, need to notify the Sheriff’s Department ahead of time.

Sources of info include: http://www.inciweb.org (including other fires) or
the incident information office at (530) 841-4451. Visit
http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/klamath for information on fire restrictions and
local closures.

Teacher’s Learning about Karuk Culture

One very special item that Jennifer Goodwin and Erin Hillman shared with teachers this week was the creation of regalia for a girl to dance in ceremonies this weekend. It took many hours of work over weeks to sew and decorate the skin skirts with fringes, shells, beads albalone, deertoes, and braided bear grass but it was beautiful and made a pleasant sound as it moved around. The design on the top was “friendship design.” The skirts were made by grant of $5,000 and worn by Frankie Snyder in her first ceremonial dance. 

 The Karuk Tribe of California Education Program Director, Jennifer Goodwin, arranged an exciting opportunity for teachers in the area schools learn more about the cultural background of the students in their classes. Not only were teachers from Happy Camp Elementary and High Schools but Jefferson Continutation school and Junction School from Somes Bar. It was a pleasure to have Tom Fox of the Northern California Writing Project and transferring soon to the the National Writing Project share current resources for teaching writing.

 A panel was assembled to answer all the questions that the teachers cared to ask about the Karuk culture, past and present. Jennifer and Erin shared the regalia project. Dan Goodwin, tonyu, Blanche, Bud Johnson,  of fisheries, Paula McCarthy, Clayton Tuttle, Ben Harrison and Phinuggtuuf took part in the panel. The brush dance was traditionally done at the home of a sick child for healing and although it is still done for healing, it is done on a regular basis for good health and prosperity to preserve the tradition. There isn’t alot of “pow wow” dancing here but war dancing was mentioned. Community is always open to watch and usually food for all. It’s a way of balancing, a way of living, they said. Because the Karuk never had a reservation each family had their own place that they lived from Bluff Creek to Seiad Valley. When the gold rush intruded into this place, the government wanted to ship them all out to Hoopa, not realizing there was differences between Hoopa Tribe, Yurok Tribe and Karuk Tribe who didn’t speak the same language at all.  The Yurok were “downriver “people and the Karuk “upriver people.” Paula McCarthy siad her mom was sent to Indian School in Riverside and Native Americans there were punished for speaking their native languages. The Karuk Tribe of California started with 10 or 12 acres donated to the Tribe in Orleans and has purchased and developed nearly 600 acress in Orleans, Witchepec, Happy Camp and Yreka since being recognized.  Verna shared how she learned basketweaving from Grace and Madeline Davis and they wanted her to “pass it on.” Kenneth Brink said, “Red devils, blue devils or dust devils”, the Putawan is a devil, but “not so scarry anymore.” The mascot of the Happy Camp Elementary School has been the Putawan for many years. So the teachers learned many new things from the panel on the Karuk culture and hopes are to share further in the future. 

 Besides delving into discussions on “What connections there are or could be between writing in school and writing in real life in Happy Camp,” there were opportunities to talk to tribal members about their culture and Tribal employees about how they use writing in their employment, working with language as Susan Gehr, writing grants like   or writing lessons to teach. reports, minutes, agenda’s and articles.  

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